Cat & Dog Vaccinations Mean a Longer Life with You

At our animal hospital in Paris, TX, we believe vaccines give your pet a significantly better chance at a longer, healthier life with you. Cat and dog vaccinations are divided into two categories: core and noncore. Core vaccines are highly recommended (and in Texas, some are required by law) while noncore vaccines depend on your pet’s lifestyle and risk level.

Which Vaccines Your Pet Needs and When to Schedule Them

Pets require vaccinations on a regular basis throughout their lives to build and maintain effective immunities. Below is a list of vaccines your pet may need and when we administer them.

Core Vaccines for Dogs

  • Rabies, required by law in Texas
    • Given before 4 months of age
    • Booster 12 months after the initial shot, then annually
  • DHPP (distemper, hepatitis, parvovirus, parainfluenza)
    • Given as an initial series of three, starting at 6-8 weeks of age, then every 3-4 weeks for each consecutive shot
    • Booster 12 months after the initial series, then annually
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Noncore Vaccines for Dogs

  • Leptospirosis (recommended for dogs who are frequently outdoors)
    • Given with the final two shots of the DHPP combo
    • Booster 12 months after the initial series, then annually as long as risk is high
  • Bordetella, or “kennel cough” (recommended for social dogs who are boarded, in puppy/dog training, or visiting the groomer)
    • Given as an initial series of two, starting at 6-8 weeks, then again in 3-4 weeks
    • Annually as long as risk is high
  • Canine Influenza (recommended for social dogs, similar to Bordetella)
    • Given as an initial series of two, starting at 8 weeks, then again in 3-4 weeks
    • Booster 12 months after the initial series, then annually as long as risk is high
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Core Vaccines for Cats

  • Rabies, required by law in Texas
    • Given before 4 months of age
    • Booster 12 months after the initial shot, then annually
  • FVRCP (feline viral rhinotracheitis, calicivirus, panleukopenia)
    • Given as an initial series of three, starting at 6-8 weeks of age, then every 3-4 weeks for each consecutive shot
    • Booster 12 months after the initial series, then annually
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Noncore Vaccines for Cats

  • Feline Leukemia
    • Given as an initial series of two, starting at 8-12 weeks, then again in 3-4 weeks
    • Booster 12 months after the initial series, then annually for as long as risk is high
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Ready to Make Your Appointment?

Whether you have a new puppy or kitten who needs to build their immunity or an older pet who needs to maintain it, schedule your appointment today!

Understanding Your Pet's Immunity

Both human and pet vaccinations work in a similar way: they are made up of a weakened virus which activates the body’s immune system, triggering antibodies to suppress the weak virus. The immune system then retains a sort of “muscle memory” so if it comes into contact with the real virus, it will successfully fight the disease. Unlike human vaccines, though, pets' "muscle memory" fades in time. That's why they need boosters to maintain resistance.